From birth to age eight, children take the first steps in a lifelong learning journey. EDC speeds them on their way by designing, studying, supporting, and scaling up programs that enhance school readiness and success. We have a special focus on meeting the needs of children from disadvantaged communities and dual language learners, engaging and supporting families, and building the capacity of educators and communities to sustain improvements.

In the United States, we work to create strong, coherent preK-Grade 3 systems and advance knowledge of how to improve early science, mathematics, and literacy learning. Around the world, we implement innovative early childhood programs that build literacy and numeracy skills, excite interest in learning, and help educators, volunteers, and parents enrich early learning.

Read "A Fair Start for Every Child" to learn more about EDC's work to support early childhood learning.

Learn about EDC’s work with Family STEM Communities.

Learn about EDC’s work to strengthen early childhood interventions with Continuous Quality Improvement.

Learn about the work of EDC’s Center for Children and Technology.

Related Content

A New Language for Mathematics
Young children often struggle to write down their mathematical ideas. Could computer programming be an easier language for them?

EDC Talks: Making Time for Family Math
What are some fun, easy activities that families can do to encourage math learning at home? (Hint: You are probably already doing some of them.)

Tapping, Swiping, and Learning Science
Research findings on The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That!™ have implications for parents, educators, and educational media developers.

Helping All Children Learn and Thrive
EDC’s David Jacobson discusses his ideas for changing—and improving—early childhood services.

Tools to Support Preschool Learning
New resources support educators on integrating technology and working with emergent bilingual learners.

The Other Side of the Screen
As a researcher, Tiffany Maxon gets to help develop the next generation of children’s television shows.

Resources

Here are a few of our resources on early childhood development and learning. To see more, visit our Resources section.

Toolkits

This checklist provides early childhood educators with practical tips for supporting children’s bilingual learning within a rich classroom environment.

Reports

Executive Summary of a report that examines The Cat in the Hat Knows a Lot About That!™, a PBS KIDS multi-platform media property based on “The Cat in the Hat’s Learning Library” book series by Random House and Dr. Seuss Enterprises.

Studies

This snapshot presents findings from an EDC study on child care collaboration conducted in Maryland and Vermont.

Toolkits

Published by Brookes, the Early Language and Literacy Classroom Observation (ELLCO) pre-K and K–3 toolkits are research-based instruments that enable teachers, leaders, and researchers to observe,

Reports

This report presents findings from a yearlong investigation of the Apple and ConnectED initiative in 10 preschool classrooms.

Videos

In this video, NSF-funded researchers Arthur Barody, Jere Confrey, Paul Goldenberg, and Julie Sarama discuss the importance of mathematics education in the early grades.

Reports

This factsheet provides an overview of some of EDC’s work to strengthen P-3 programs and systems to foster dual-language proficiency and improve outcomes for young dual-language learners.

Reports

EDC and SRI International conducted an independent study of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) KIDS Play & Learn Science app, which includes in-app and direct hands-on science explorations for children ages 3 to 6 and their parents.

White papers

This EDC brief spotlights how important it is for new mothers to receive responsive and supportive postpartum care.

Reports

This report presents findings from a study that examined whether child care providers that partnered with Head Start programs showed improvements in the quality of their services compared with similar child care providers that did not partner with Head Start. The authors report that partnership predicts improved classroom quality; partnership duration predicts observed quality; and partnership predicts some improvements in school readiness outcomes.