Wendy Martin staff portrait

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Wendy Martin, PhD, researches and designs educational technologies that support student learning and teacher professional development.

Martin’s work focuses on emerging technologies, including classroom-based educational games and design-based research to support teacher practice. She is currently involved in multiple efforts to improve science, technology, and engineering opportunities for students in New York City, including the development of an engineering design program for students in autism-inclusion settings and the evaluation of the city’s CS4All initiative. As principal investigator of the Digital Games as Analogical Sources for Science Learning project, Martin is also investigating the relationships among game design, explicit analogy mapping techniques, and students’ understanding of complex science concepts.

Martin holds a BA from Duke University, an MA from New York University’s Steinhardt School of Education, and a PhD from Cornell University.

Speaking Highlights

Using Analogy Mapping to Teach Electricity with a Digital Game

Co-presentation, American Educational Research Association Conference
Washington, D.C.
2016

Identifying and Assessing Computational Thinking Practices

Co-presentation, International Conference of the Learning Sciences
Boulder, CO
2014

Media

Blog Posts

Selected Publications

Culp, K. M., Martin, W., & Silander, M. (2015) Extending the impact of digital games by supporting analogical reasoning. Proceedings of the 2015 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play (pp. 487–492). New York, NY: ACM.

Culp, K., Martin, W. Clements, P., & Lewis, A. (2014, August). Testing the impact of a pre-instructional digital game on middle-grade students’ understanding of photosynthesis. Technology, Knowledge and Learning, 1–22.

Martin, W., Strother, S., Beglau, M., Bates, L., & Reitzes, T. (2010). Connecting instructional technology professional development to teacher and student outcomes. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 43(1), 53–74.

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