Carrie Parker

Contact

617-618-2740

Carrie Parker, EdD, leads research to improve programs and policies for all students, particularly culturally and linguistically diverse learners, including those with disabilities and English learners. She researches a wide range of education reform issues, including educational equity, technology integration, and strategies to enhance STEM learning and teaching. She has expertise in multiple research methodologies and statistical techniques, including survey development; secondary data analysis; descriptive and multivariate statistics; and quasi-experimental, mixed methods, and case study designs.

Parker prioritizes collaborating with practitioners to align research questions with problems of practice and ensure research designs respond to the realities of student and teacher experiences. She focuses on identifying opportunity gaps and barriers to achievement for all students—particularly English learners and students with disabilities. Her work on culturally and linguistically diverse students provides new evidence on effective strategies to engage families, enhance learning through technology integration, and remove barriers to reaching English proficiency.

Parker holds an EdD in administration, planning, and social policy from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Speaking Highlights

Beyond Tallies: Evaluating Quality of Technology Use in High School Science Classrooms

Presentaiton, American Evaluation Association
Washington, D.C.
November 10, 2017

Inclusive Dual Enrollment Transition Services: Effective Partnerships Between High Schools and Colleges for Students With Intellectual Disabilities

Presentation, Council for Exceptional Chidlren Convention
Boston, MA
April 27, 2017

Engaging Families of English Language Learners with Disabilities

Massachusetts Educators of English Language Learners Conference
Framingham, MA
May 5, 2017

TOP-Science Technology Observation Protocol

STELAR ITEST PI & Evaluator Summit 2016: Making Connections to Broaden Participation in STEM
Washington, DC
May 2, 2016

The New Face of Research and Evaluation in ITEST Projects

Presentation, STEM Learning and Research Center (STELAR) Webinar
February 26, 2015

Media

Blog Posts

Evaluation Findings Show Positive Outcomes from Algebra Intervention
EDC Learning and Teaching Division blog, September 20, 2013

Radio

Selected Publications

Kieffer, M. J., & Parker, C. E. (2017). Graduation outcomes of students who entered New York City public schools in grade 5 or 6 as English learner students (REL 2017–237). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast & Islands. Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs.

Kieffer, M. J. & Parker, C. E. (2016). Patterns of English learner student reclassification in New York City public schools (REL 2017–200). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Regional Educational Laboratory Northeast & Islands. Retrieved from http:// ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs.

Connors-Kellgren, A., Parker, C. E., Blustein, D. L., & Barnett, M. (2016). Innovations and Challenges in Project-Based STEM Education: Lessons from ITEST. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 1-8. doi: 10.1007/s10956-016-9658-9

Rinaldi, C., Parker, C. E. (2016). Breaking Down Silos, Joining Forces in Education. Language Magazine.

Ryan, S., Parker, C. E., Rinaldi, C., Avery, M., Fournier, R. (2015). Supporting Districts to Engage Families of English Language Learners Who Have or Might Have Disabilities. A Report to the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

Parker, C., Schillaci, R., Bonney, C., Stylinski, C., & McAuliffe, C. (2015). Exploring the elements of a classroom technology implementation framework. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 47 (2).

Selected Resources

Reports

The proliferation of new technologies is changing the way we live, learn, and work. This white paper examines the complex and interconnected challenges related to workforce development, economics, education, equity, and ethics that our society must address to ensure our workforce is future-ready.